CSO CYO MIX 2324

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Christian Reif, conductor

Clara-Jumi Kang, violin

 

The 1913 premiere of Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring was perhaps the most famous opening-night scandal in history. Confronted with its primal and untamed nature, its first audience was ignited into a riot, instantly cementing its reputation as a work that, to this day, triggers visceral responses. Conductor Christian Reif sets the stage for our wild encounter with a light and airy dance by Manuel de Falla and violinist Clara-Jumi Kang, bringing her poise to Bartók's second violin concerto.

Program

DE FALLA: Interlude and Dance from La vida breve
BARTÓK: Violin Concerto No. 2

STRAVINSKY: Le Sacre du printemps ("The Rite of Spring")

Louis Langrée, conductor
George Takei, narrator

 

The CSO performs music of American composers representing a variety of perspectives. Bernstein’s optimistic Candide and gripping score to the Oscarwinning film On the Waterfront frame a program including Copland’s Lincoln Portrait, a reprise from Louis Langrée’s first CSO subscription concert as Music Director, and Florence Price’s Symphony No. 1. In 1933, Price’s magnificent, tour de force Symphony No. 1 was the first symphonic work by a Black woman to be played by a major American orchestra.

Program

BERNSTEIN: Overture to Candide

PRICE: Symphony No. 1

COPLAND: Lincoln Portrait
BERNSTEIN: Symphonic Suite from On the Waterfront

James Gaffigan, conductor

 

Fantasy kingdoms, scandalous love affairs, dwarfs, giants, and powerful music. Game of Thrones? Tolkien? Actually, before those came the Ring cycle, Wagner’s master achievement in his quest to create an all-encompassing theatrical experience. Conductor James Gaffigan returns to lead the CSO in a concert compilation of Wagner’s four epic operas, on a program that opens with two musical gems: Bacewicz’s delightfully bracing Overture and Mozart’s well-known Eine kleine Nachtmusik.

Program

BACEWICZ: Overture

MOZART: Eine kleine Nachtmusik (Serenade in G Major)
WAGNER: Der Ring ohne Worte für Orchester ("The Ring Without Words")

Gustavo Gimeno, conductor

Christian Tetzlaff, violin

 

“One of today’s most in-demand violinists” (NPR), Christian Tetzlaff returns to Music Hall after last showcasing his “jaw-dropping virtuosity” (Cincinnati Enquirer) here in the Queen City in 2017. Conductor Gustavo Gimeno leads Tetzlaff and the CSO in Szymanowski’s sweepingly lyrical Violin Concerto and a world premiere from Daníel Bjarnason’s multi-part commissioned work. Tchaikovsky’s wellspring of melodies is on display in his Fifth Symphony — opening with a fateful funeral march, winding through a sonorous solo horn song and lilting waltz, then finishing with bombastic brass.

Program

Daníel BJARNASON: New Work, Part II (CSO Co-Commission, World Premiere)

SZYMANOWSKI: Violin Concerto No. 1
TCHAIKOVSKY: Symphony No. 5

Louis Langrée, conductor
Jodie DeVos, Ophélie

Stéphane Degout, Hamlet

Béatrice Uria Monzon, Gertrude
Laurent Alvaro, Claudius
Cyril Teste, stage director
Céline Gaudier, stage assistant
Julien Boizard, lights
Mehdi Toutain-Lopez, Vidéo

May Festival Chorus

 

"To be or not to be….” French composer Ambroise Thomas’ grand opera is a musical setting of Shakespeare’s tragic story of the melancholic Prince Hamlet, his murderous uncle, ghostly father,and lover driven to madness. Louis Langrée leads the CSO and May Festival Chorus in this new touring production created in collaboration with Paris’ famed Ópera Comique.

Program

THOMAS: Hamlet 

Dalia Stasevska, conductor
Davóne Tines, baritone

 

Dalia Stasevska returns to lead a Thanksgiving weekend of music that calls us home. Music drawn from the American heartland opens the program, with the beloved “Goin’ Home” theme from Dvořák’s New World Symphony, George Walker’s Lyric for Strings, and baritone Davóne Tines performing Saariaho’s True Fire, a work based on Native American texts and Emmerson’s Spiritual Laws. Sibelius’s Fifth Symphony provides a finale of sweeping and grand themes, evoking the spirit of Stasevska's own Finnish homeland.

Program

DVOŘÁK: Largo from Symphony No. 9, From the New World

Kaija SAARIAHO: True Fire

WALKER: Lyric for Strings
SIBELIUS: Symphony No. 5

Case Scaglione, conductor
Randolph Bowman, flute
Henrik Heide, flute
Stefani Matsuo, violin

 

Two extremes of orchestral scale combine for a showcase of the CSO that’s both intimate and expansive. Conductor Case Scaglione makes his CSO debut with Bach’s beautifully playful Brandenburg Concerto No. 4, which highlights individual virtuosity within a smaller ensemble, alongside Mahler’s Symphony No. 5. First performed in the U.S. by the CSO, Mahler’s Fifth Symphony employs an orchestra of impressive proportions, from its iconic trumpet opening to the beloved, emotional Adagietto.

 

Program

BACH: Brandenburg Concerto No. 4

MAHLER: Symphony No. 5

Sir Donald Runnicles, conductor

Daniil Trifonov, piano

 

Sir Donald Runnicles, celebrated for his interpretations of Romantic symphonic repertoire, leads an all-Brahms program, joining forces with powerhouse pianist Daniil Trifonov, following his stunning solo Music Hall performance in 2022. Together, they explore Brahms’ more brooding and emotional side in his Piano Concerto No. 1. Runnicles then conducts the CSO in Brahms’ Symphony No. 2, from its iconic “lullaby” to its cheerfully triumphant and brass-filled finale.

Program

BRAHMS: Piano Concerto No. 1

BRAHMS: Symphony No. 2

Kevin John Edusei, conductor
George Li, piano

 

Conductor Kevin John Edusei leads a program that invites you to explore the concept of harmony and its many forms, beginning with Elysium by Samy Moussa, a composer who has a “gleeful sense for…shocking harmony” (Los Angeles Times). John Adams describes his rhythmically and harmonically complex Harmonielehre as a parody “without the intent to ridicule”, with “shades of Mahler, Sibelius and Debussy.” Both pieces frame George Li's performance of the Second Piano Concerto from Rachmaninoff, arguably the hero of the lush, romantic style.

Program

Samy MOUSSA: Elysium
RACHMANINOFF: Piano Concerto No. 2

John ADAMS: Harmonielehre

Dame Jane Glover, conductor
Stefani Matsuo, violin
Christian Colberg, viola

 

Dame Jane Glover is widely regarded as a preeminent conductor of Mozart’s music. She leads an “all-Amadeus” program, showcasing CSO Concertmaster Stefani Matsuo and Principal Viola Christian Colberg in Mozart's Sinfonia Concertante in E-flat Major, K. 364. Their performance is folded between works illustrating Mozart’s evolution of the symphony from the lighter style of early composers such as Haydn to the more emotionally-infused music of Beethoven.

Program

MOZART: Symphony No. 13

MOZART: Sinfonia Concertante in E-flat Major, K. 364

MOZART: Symphony No. 36, Linz

Cristian Mǎcelaru, conductor
Kian Soltani, cello

 

Grammy-winning conductor Cristian Măcelaru joins the CSO for music of two Slavic luminaries. Cellist Kian Soltani brings his expressive and charismatic presence to Lutosławski’s Cello Concerto, frequently interpreted as an escalating struggle between the seemingly heroic soloist and the orchestra representing totalitarian authority. The acclaim and popularity of his Symphony No. 11 helped Shostakovich, who had weathered criticism and persecution from the Soviet regime, win back State approval. It offers a depiction of the 1905 Russian Revolution, from the first shots of Bloody Sunday to funeral marches lamenting those who were lost.

Program

LUTOSŁAWSKI: Cello Concerto

SHOSTAKOVICH: Symphony No. 11, The Year 1905

Louis Langrée, conductor
Joélle Harvey, soprano 
Will Liverman, baritone
May Festival Chorus

 

With prayerful music for both the living and the dead, the source of comfort in Brahms’ German Requiem is as much human as it is the divine. Louis Langrée leads the CSO along with the May Festival Chorus in Brahms’ large-scale masterpiece. Though Brahms was often discreet in nature, this is a deeply personal work. Spurred by the loss of his mother, and influenced by lingering emotions of self-doubt, he turned to his true religion – music – as a way to console not only himself, but others as well.

Program

BRAHMS: Ein Deutsches Requiem ("German Requiem")

Matthias Pintscher, conductor

Conrad Tao, piano

 

As the winter winds quell and the flowers of spring begin to blossom, CSO Creative Partner Matthias Pintscher conducts the Orchestra in works capturing the feeling of life beginning anew. Copland’s Appalachian Spring shines with the “Simple Gifts” of the season. After wowing CSO audiences in 2021 and 2022, pianist Conrad Tao returns for the world premiere of a CSO commissioned work from composer inti figgis-vizueta, whose music “feels sprouted between structures” (The Washington Post). Then, Schumann's Symphony No. 1 triumphantly ushers in the spring season.

Program

COPLAND: Appalachian Spring
inti figgis-vizueta: New Work, (CSO Commission, World Premiere)

  1. SCHUMANN: Symphony No. 1, Spring

Sir Mark Elder, conductor

Pavel Kolesnikov, piano

 

Stories of glory, chivalry and adventure abound as conductor Sir Mark Elder joins the CSO. Wagner’s Tannhäuser is a musical story of lust, love, and deliverance, as the opera’s title character makes a pilgrimage from the magical realm of Venus to his final redemption in Rome. Strauss’ Ein Heldenleben is an epic portrayal of the hero that exists in all of us, along with the accompanying joys and struggles, depicted through battling brass and tender string melodies. Pianist Pavel Kolesnikov brings his “fluid, fine-toned” (Gramophone) playing to Mozart’s melodic Piano Concerto No. 17.

Program

WAGNER: Overture to Tannhäuser
MOZART: Piano Concerto No. 17

  1. STRAUSS: Ein Heldenleben ("A Hero's Life")

Ryan Bancroft, conductor

Inon Barnatan, piano

 

“Music is life, and like it, it is inextinguishable.” With this declaration written at the top of his score, Carl Nielsen’s Symphony No. 4 pits the everlasting spirit of life against the horror of World War I with dramatic music leading to, what else, but a battle between two timpani! Making his CSO debut, conductor Ryan Bancroft opens this program with Samuel Coleridge-Taylor’s Ballade for Orchestra, and Tchaikovsky’s Piano Concerto No. 1, displaying the virtuosity of guest pianist Inon Barnatan, heralded by The New York Times as “one of the most admired pianists of his generation.”

Program

Samuel COLERIDGE-TAYLOR: Ballade for Orchestra
TCHAIKOVSKY: Piano Concerto No. 1
NIELSEN: Symphony No. 4, The Inextinguishable

Louis Langrée, conductor

Augustin Hadelich, violin

 

Schoenberg's music, before he became known as a father of 20th-century 12-tone composition, developed from the harmonic bedrock of Romantics like Brahms, Mahler and Richard Strauss. His "Transfigured Night" was further heightened when Schoenberg met the love of his life and found inspiration in poetry of hope and acceptance. Led by Louis Langrée, the CSO performs this, along with Brahms' Violin Concerto, which features the return of Grammy-winning violinist Augustin Hadelich, and a co-commission from former CSO Composer-in-Residence Jonathan Bailey Holland.

Program

Jonathan Bailey HOLLAND: New Work (CSO Co-Commission, CSO Premiere)
SCHOENBERG: Verklärte Nacht, (“Transfigured Night”)
BRAHMS: Violin Concerto

Katharina Wincor, conductor
Sheku Kanneh-Mason, cello

 

Dvořák’s Symphony No. 8 is filled with optimistic and lyrical music, leading to a finale of fanfares and dances. Conductor Katharina Wincor, who led the May Festival's 2022 production of Candide, returns to Music Hall and welcomes cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason for Shostakovich's raw and rhythmic first Cello Concerto.

Program

SHOSTAKOVICH: Festive Overture

SHOSTAKOVICH: Cello Concerto No. 1

DVORAK: Symphony No. 8

Louis Langrée, conductor

Alice Sara Ott, piano

 

If Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony is known as a musical embodiment of fate, his Seventh carries the spirit of freedom and liberation, with catchy, dance-like melodies woven throughout. Bryce Dessner, founder of Cincinnati’s MusicNOW Festival and a member of the Grammy-winning band The National, shares two of his works for orchestra.

 

Program

Bryce DESSNER: Mari

Bryce DESSNER: Piano Concerto (CSO Co-Commission, US Premiere)

BEETHOVEN: Symphony No. 7

Louis Langrée, conductor
Latonia Moore, soprano

Janni Younge, director

 

This is a Firebird unlike any you’ve experienced before. Louis Langrée, in his final program as Music Director, leads the CSO in the premiere of a new song cycle by Anthony Davis, whose 2007 You Have the Right to Remain Silent made a poignant impression on CSO Livestream audiences in 2020. Then, Langrée concludes his tenure in collaboration with South African director Janni Younge of Janni Younge Productions, which is critically acclaimed for imaginative designs including their Tony Award-winning puppetry in War Horse. The result is a visually stunning performance of Stravinsky’s complete ballet score with music of enchantment, infernal dance, and a finale featuring the Firebird making a glorious appearance inside Music Hall.

Program

Anthony DAVIS: New Orchestral Song Cycle (CSO Commission, World Premiere)
STRAVINSKY: The Firebird ("L'oiseau de feu")

John Morris Russell, conductor
Stephen Schwartz, piano

Grammy and Oscar-winning composer and musical icon Stephen Schwartz joins conductor John Morris Russell and the Pops for breathtaking performances of his exquisite songs in an unforgettable evening of musical theatre from Godspell to Wicked and beyond. Featuring award-winning Broadway vocalists, the legendary songwriter and his friends open the season with classics like “Day by Day,” “Popular,” “Corner of the Sky,” “Beautiful City” and “Defying Gravity.”

Damon Gupton, Conductor

 

Join Pops Principal Guest Conductor Damon Gupton and the Cincinnati Pops for a symphonic celebration of Disney music, animation, and memories — 100 years in the making! Favorite characters and soundtracks from Walt Disney Animation Studios and Disney Parks come together live on stage and on the big screen at Music Hall in a live-to-film concert like never before. Journey on a magic carpet ride through the most memorable song, score and movie moments of the first 100 years of The Walt Disney Company, including Peter Pan, Moana, Aladdin, The Jungle Book, Frozen, The Lion King, Fantasia, Encanto, Disney Parks classics and more.

John Morris Russell, conductor
Capathia Jenkins, vocalist

 

It’s the most wonderful time of the year with JMR, the Pops and Cincinnati’s beloved Holiday tradition! Music Hall will be decked-out as choruses, dancers, and Queen City favorite Capathia Jenkins bring festive favorites and holiday classics to life.

John Morris Russell, conductor

 

Love the classic sounds of Frankie Valli, The Drifters, The Del Vikings? Join conductor John Morris Russell and the Pops for The Doo Wop Project. From foundational tunes of groups like the Crests and Flamingos through their influences on the sounds of Smokey Robinson, The Temptations, and The Four Seasons all the way to Doo Wop-ified versions of modern musicians like Michael Jackson and Jason Mraz. Featuring stars of Broadway’s smash hits Jersey Boys and Motown: The Musical, the Doo Wop Project brings unparalleled authenticity of sound and vocal excellence to recreate some of the greatest music in American pop and rock history!

John Morris Russell, conductor

 

Conductor John Morris Russell and the Pops present Peter Boyer’s poignant Ellis Island: The Dream of America, celebrating the historic American immigrant experience and the American dream. Innovative in its format, bringing elements of theater and multimedia, including historical images from the Ellis Island archives, performers share real stories of those arriving to America and the circumstances surrounding their journey. The program opens by showcasing the vibrancy of Cincinnati’s international communities, with choruses and dancers presenting cultural traditions from around the world.

Seductive hip thrusts, finger snaps, “wah-wah” trumpets and — murder! Or, rather, an alleged murder. Chicago’s electrifying tale of greed, corruption, exploitation, adultery and yes, murder, is the longest running American musical in Broadway history and has now been reimagined for the concert hall! Roxie, Velma, Amos, Billy, and the Merry Murderesses of the Cook County Jail will bring you everything you know and love about the “Cell Block Tango,” “Mr. Cellophane,” “Nowadays,” and the rest of the dynamic score, including “All That Jazz.” Whether it is your first experience or you’re a long-time fan, Chicago with the Cincinnati Pops will have a special razzle dazzle for you quite unlike any other.

Louis Langrée, conductor

 

Created to give a platform to talented young African American pianists, the Competition will take place this summer in Cincinnati on the University of Cincinnati's College-Conservatory of Music campus. The Competition aims to get more African American artists on concert stages, to commission new works, and to add more African American pianistic voices to the classical canon. Join the competition's three finalists as they come together with Louis Langrée and the CSO to compete for the grand prize on Music Hall's stage.

John Morris Russell, conductor

 

Love and fellowship ring throughout Music Hall for one of Cincinnati's most anticipated musical traditions of each year! JMR leads the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, the Classical Roots Community Choir and Nouveau Players in an evening of powerful and inspirational music.

Sarah Hicks, conductor

The great Peter Falk narrates the romantic tale of the beautiful maiden, Buttercup, and her one true love, a young farm hand named Westley. After Westley's captured by a ruthless pirate and presumed dead, Buttercup’s unhappy marriage to the horrible Prince Humperdinck seems inevitable. But before the wedding can take place, she’s kidnapped by three outlaws and it’s up to a mysterious Man in Black to come to her rescue. Missing this cinematic concert experience would be inconceivable! So, in the words of Miracle Max… “Have fun stormin’ the castle!”

Anthony Parnther, conductor

The fate of the Resistance hangs in the balance! New heroes and galactic legends join forces as Rey seeks the aid of Luke Skywalker to thwart the rise of Kylo Ren and the First Order. The Last Jedi unlocks mysteries of the Force and shocking revelations of the past on the big screen as the full force of the Cincinnati Pops Orchestra performs John Williams’ acclaimed score live to film.

John Morris Russell, conductor
Denzal Sinclaire, vocalist

 

JMR and The Pops ring in 2024 with the sophisticated jazz stylings of Edward “Duke” Ellington to celebrate the 125th anniversary of the legendary pianist and composers’ birth. Swing to the classic and elegant sounds of “Duke” as we celebrate New Year's Eve in style.